Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Review: Drums of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon

Another re-read in this series that I love, and another home run. This book was slower than some in the series, and it took me a while longer to get through than I expected, but I still enjoyed it a lot. Gabaldon does a great job of researching the time periods and locations she writes about (at least, *I* can't tell if there are any inaccuracies, but maybe a historian would have a bone to pick. I'd be interested in hearing from someone with a stronger background in history than I have).

In this installment, ***** SPOILER ALERT ***** Claire has returned to the 1700's and the love of her life, Jamie Fraser. She has left her daughter Brianna behind her in Boston, and she and Jamie have crossed the ocean to the Colonies. While they are trying to eke out an existence in the New World, Brianna remains in 1960's Boston, developing her burgeoning relationship with Roger MacKenzie Wakefield. When Brianna discovers some frightening information about her parents' lives in the past, she must make a decision that could change her life, and Roger's, forever.

People often ask me how I can re-read a book. Don't I already know how it ends? What's the point? Well, I first read this series about five years ago, during the end of law school, my summer studying for the Florida Bar, and the first year or so of my new life here in Florida. I honestly have forgotten most of the details of the books, so re-reading them is almost like experiencing the events for the first time. I remember the larger plot points, and sometimes things come back to me as I read, but most of the smaller details are like new to me.

I continue to rave about this series. The second read is as good as the first. I highly recommend this series for anyone who like historical fiction and certainly for romance lovers. Four out of five Whatevers for this one!


1 comment:

NerdGirl said...

I am also a re-reader. There are just some books that I like to revisit over and over. Of course, there are a exceptions. If the magic of the book depended on me not knowing a specific piece of information until a certain time, I'm probably not going to reread it